Sea Salt vs Table Salt


sea salt versus table saltWhat is the difference between sea salt and table salt?

Sea salt has boomed in popularity in restaurants and supermarket aisles. Many gourmet chefs say they prefer it over table salt for its coarse, crunchy texture and stronger flavor. Manufacturers are using it in potato chips and other snacks because it’s “all natural,” and less processed than table salt. And some health-conscious consumers choose it because it contains minerals like magnesium.

Each of the above-mentioned characteristics may set sea salt apart from table salt, but in one other very important respect there’s usually little difference between the two: sodium content.

How does the amount of sodium in sea salt compare to table salt?

In a survey conducted by the American Heart Association, 61 percent of respondents incorrectly agreed that sea salt is a lower sodium alternative to table salt. Table salt and most sea salts contain about 40 percent sodium by weight.

Kosher salt and some sea salts may have larger crystal sizes than table salt, so they may have less sodium by volume (e.g., by teaspoon or tablespoon). A teaspoon of table salt has about 2,300 mg of sodium, but a teaspoon of sea salt or kosher salt may have less sodium because fewer crystals fit into the spoon.

Some varieties of sea salt may claim to have less sodium than table salt. You can check the Nutrition Facts label to compare how a given sea salt compares to table salt, which has about 575 mg sodium per ¼ teaspoon.

What does an AHA expert say about sea salt vs. table salt?

“It’s very important for people to be aware that sea salt often has as much sodium as table salt,” said Rachel K. Johnson, Ph.D., R.D., an American Heart Association spokeswoman and the Bickford Professor of Nutrition at the University of Vermont.

“One of the keys to maintaining a heart-healthy diet is to control your sodium intake,” she said. “If you’re consuming more sea salt than you otherwise would because you think it has less sodium, then you may be placing yourself at higher risk of developing high blood pressure, which raises your risk of heart disease.”

What’s the difference between the way sea salt and table salt are made?

Sea salt is obtained directly through the evaporation of seawater. It is usually not processed, or undergoes minimal processing, and therefore retains trace levels of minerals like magnesium, potassium, calcium and other nutrients.

Table salt, on the other hand, is mined from salt deposits and then processed to give it a fine texture so it’s easier to mix and use in recipes. Processing strips table salt of any minerals it may have contained, and additives are also usually added to prevent clumping or caking.

Is there a health advantage to eating sea salt?

While some attributes may make sea salt more attractive from a marketing standpoint, Dr. Johnson says there are no real health advantages of most sea salts.

“The minute amounts of trace minerals found in sea salt are easily obtained from other healthy foods,” Dr. Johnson said. “Sea salt also generally contains less iodine than table salt. Iodine has been added to table salt since the 1920s to prevent the iodine-deficiency disease goiter.”

So, which option is better to choose?

The next time you find yourself choosing between kosher salt, sea salt and table salt, remember that it’s probably mostly a matter of letting your taste buds decide.  But whichever option you choose, keep in mind that both usually contain the same amount of sodium.

Tell Kraft it’s time to break up with salt!

Nearly 80% of the sodium you eat every day is hidden from you — put in the foods you enjoy without any way for you to control how much you’re getting.

It’s time to take back control!

The most effective way to help lessen the amount of sodium Americans eat is for restaurants and food companies to take the excess sodium out of their products. Kraft has shown an interest in sodium reduction in the past, and hearing from concerned consumers like you will help motivate them to keep up their efforts.

Send Kraft a letter now.

Let them know you plan to purchase foods with less sodium in them, and you’re watching to see what they do.

 

Take the pledge to reduce the sodium in your diet today.
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