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Eat Less Sodium by Eating More Fruits and Vegetables

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Eat Less Sodium by Eating More Fruits and Vegetables

June is National Fresh Fruit and Vegetable month! This month, we're celebrating the many ways you can add color to your plate with bright fruits and flavorful vegetables. From adding fruits and vegetables at breakfast to discovering produce enjoyed around the world we’ll give you lots of ideas throughout the month.

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Fruits and vegetables are nutritious and can naturally have less sodium than many processed foods. When you cut the amount of processed food you eat, you usually cut sodium too! Our new graphic on processed foods explains it, and we encourage you to share it with your social networks.

Share the graphic today!

When it comes to processed foods, we learned some great strategies during the #BreakUpWithSalt contest such as this tip from Keltcie Delamar, Richmond, VA.

"When preparing processed foods at home, divide portions in half and add an equal amount of cooked vegetables. It lessens the sodium and multiplies the vegetables."

Replacing less-healthy, highly-processed foods with vegetables is a smart idea. We know that fruits and vegetables add color to your plate, and they also help you get needed potassium. And don’t forget, even processed fruits and vegetables can be a part of a healthy way to eat. Canned, frozen and dried are just as nutritious as fresh-- but they can come with unwelcome additives. Follow these quick tips to choose the healthiest option:

  • Check labels to find options with the lowest amounts of sodium and added sugars.
  • Choose fruits and vegetables packed in their own juice or water and prepared without heavy syrups or sauces.
  • Drain and rinse canned produce thoroughly in a colander.

Not sure how much to aim for? The AHA recommends eating 4 1/2 cups of fruits and vegetables daily.

With the average American adult eating 1 1/2 cups each day, we have some room to add more color. In fact, if Americans ate just one more serving of fruits and vegetables per day, more than thirty thousand lives could be saved.

Are you excited for fruit and veggie month? You can follow Healthy For Good on Facebook and Twitter for fun weekly themes on how you can Add Color! A different recipe and how-to video related to the weekly themes and simple tips will be featured daily throughout the month.

  • Week 1: Fruits and Vegetables
  • Week 2: Fruits and Vegetables at Breakfast
  • Week 3: Fruits and Vegetables as Snacks
  • Week 4: Fruits and Vegetables Around the World
  • Week 5: Fruits and Vegetables for Dessert

Find out more and get our free guide and posters at heart.org/fruitvegetablemonth.

Join the conversation on social media and let us know: How do you add more fruits and vegetables to your plate? #addcolor